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Coffee is perhaps the most popular and most consumed beverage in the entire world, in comparison to the most popular sport in the planet, that is soccer, coffee is known every where in the world and everywhere there is a general place where countries even carry their own unique blends of beans processed through different …   Read More

Coffee is perhaps the most popular and most consumed beverage in the entire world, in comparison to the most popular sport in the planet, that is soccer, coffee is known every where in the world and everywhere there is a general place where countries even carry their own unique blends of beans processed through different variant degrees. Regardless of how much or which country makes how much coffee, a question that often does not come to mind is: Is coffee good or bad? Like many other topics I have written about the answer to this questions large misunderstood and there exists all kinds of different opinions that range due to the conflicting studies that appear every so often. As I often do, I did a bit of research about this and collected a learned basis for the understanding needed to better answer this question. One of the things that most research and opinion out there agrees on is that coffee contains caffeine, so why don’t we start to find out what caffeine is. Doesn’t caffeine rhyme perfectly with cocaine? This is because caffeine is very much a drug. Yes, it is a drug and the degree of effect that this drug is claimed to have varies. According to the HowStuffWorks website:

” Its [caffeine’s] chemical formula is C8H10N4O2. It is a drug, and actually shares a number of traits with more notorious drugs such as amphetamines, cocaine and heroin.”

Source: http://science.howstuffworks.com/caffeine.htm Caffeine is said to be a naturally occurring chemically known as trimethylxanthine. Because caffeine is a drug, it shares the common characteristic that most drugs have that is it can cause addiction; those who cannot function with their cup of coffee due to its “kick-start” function. Another known fact that everyone agrees is that caffeine is found not only in coffee but also in a variety of other products and the like: carbonated drinks like Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Dr. Pepper, Mountain Dew, etc. Energy drinks like Red Bull contain large amounts of caffeine and sugar in addition to other chemically induced stimulate. Caffeine is also found in other foods like chocolate bars, ketchup, orange juice drinks etc. Now I am going to discuses where the disagreement comes, the studies. Studies have surfaced claiming differing conflicting effects of coffee like:

  • 3 cups a day curbs memory loss
  • A cup of coffee, a morning run help keep skin cancer at bay
  • 4+ cups of coffee daily cuts the risk of gout in men over 40
  • Coffee intake tied to lower diabetes risk
  • Antioxidants lower risk of cardiovascular diseases in women over 55

A recent study shows that coffee overdose can produce the following consequences: insomnia, muscle tremors, nausea, irritability, higher risk of bone fracture, diarrhoea, vomiting, convulsions and more. Source: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hl-vs/iyh-vsv/food-aliment/caffeine-eng.php To sum up, after reading and listening so much material conflicting and in favour, I could conclude that coffee is neither bad or good. What makes coffee bad is that people abuse it, because as I said, coffee contains a natural occurring drug: caffeine and as a drug that it is caffeine does produce a “good feeling” or kick-start that can become addictive. However, no until you abuse it that it will be bad for you. Ideally, it is best not to have it and even worse avoid decaffeinated coffee because then you have problem. In order to remove caffeine from coffee, there needs to be a chemical manipulation of coffee that thus becomes worse than consuming coffee itself. If caffeine is your problem, then avoid coffee altogether. So my doctor is right when he says that having a maximum of 3 cups a day, during the day time is the best possible way to consume coffee. For me, that makes sense.

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