674 0
674 0

Our connection to water goes far deeper than we realize. First, we are mostly made of water. We know from science that our bodies are mostly composed of water, estimates suggest that we are up to 60% made of water. If you live in a modernized country like Canada, which is the one I am …   Read More

Our connection to water goes far deeper than we realize. First, we are mostly made of water. We know from science that our bodies are mostly composed of water, estimates suggest that we are up to 60% made of water. If you live in a modernized country like Canada, which is the one I am writing from, we usually take for granted the fact in most other countries in the world, water is very much a commodity. For billions of people, water is not very easy to attain. Here in Canada, the fact we have water is a given. We do not realize that if you know can open your water faucet and you will see water come out is really a privilege. UNESCO estimates that about 1 billion people in Earth lack safe access to drinking water. Over 5 million people, half of that being children die from this reason every year. This situation is 10 times more deaths in wars every year. While everyone is concerned about oil shortage, especially now that it has been announced that the United States could be come top oil producer thanks to the ability to tap into previously tough to get shell oil reserves. Therefore, the preoccupation we’ve had so far about oil reserves should probably switch at some point to tackle what is the real issue. It comes to me as an amazement that water is currently being sold to use in form of water bottles. It certainly makes sense in countries with lack access to drinking water, but no to a country like Canada which has access to the largest source of fresh water on Earth, thanks to the Great Lakes. In the present, the world is facing a “War on Terror” which is not openly geared for the sake of attaining access to oil. When the problem of oil is over, which by the way, news of the shell oil reserves, perhaps should have switched gears, then we can start to see that wars will happen due to another reason regardless of the commodity in question. waterfact The other problem that exist when we are talking water, it’s water quality. Because it is not enough to simply worry about drinkable water, after all what does “drinkable” mean? For water to be deemed drinkable, it needs to meet a set of standards set out by a body of government in charge of health. The body of government which varies from government to government, has a set out standards which basically determines water to be drinkable as: “safe enough to be consumed by humans or used with low risk of immediate or long term harm.” Now, I am not sure about you, but if we are ingesting so much water over our span of life, should we merely be content with “sufficient”? There is an entire body of knowledge and public awareness campaign, led by people like you and I, and backed by science, which has been campaigning against the fluoridation of water. Now this is a whole other topic to mind, but not in the scope of this post alone to address. The important thing to note is that the water, to which we have access to is only good enough, and that baring that we are giving out a lot of trust in our government to determine what is safe for us.  The problem is that regardless of what chemicals willingly or not go into the water and what other components go in the our world’s water by “accident.” See for example the nuclear spillage in the Fukushima plant, which by the way the Japanese government has recently admitted to the fact that the threat of the nuclear spillage is more severe than we have been told, is something we need to understand because it adds to the other already problems that exist with the quality of our water. UN data alone suggest that around 10 millions tones of oil is poured into the oceans around the world each year. Along the United States Atlantic coast alone, there lie bury 90 thousand containers of radioactive waste with 100 kilo-curies of activity, while the European sea coast has 500 kilo-curies. Countries with sea access dump, industrial, construction and other radioactive materials all the time.  Some of the polluting substances dissolve and change not only the quality of the water, but also its memory. Now this is something really interesting, but really should not be surprising since we are beings capable of having memory thanks to our brains, which is composed of 73% made of water. Should we question then our knowledge of how our brain works and perhaps how memory is really stored in our brain? The experiements of Dr. Emoto show that water does contain a way to store memory. So, should we be more interested about water? Or at least, should we be more interested in the quality of the water we drink? At least for those us privileged enough to have access to water, there is something we can do, let’s inform ourselves to attain a good quality of water, such as water distillation systems and reverse osmosis, because the more we do so, the more we will have capacity to improve our own quality of being, never mind life, because the water we consume will eventually become us, so do you want to ingest “good enough” water, or rather do you want to be “good enough”?

In this article

Join the Conversation